~ The crisis of coronavirus ~

Do we all have to wear masks? Health experts are reviewing the question.

As Mr. Tsiodras, characteristically stated in our daily afternoon update on April 4 regarding the use of a fabric mask:

“Contrary to what the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the famous American CDC, has announced the optional use of a face and nose cover, e.g. even a handmade fabric mask from a piece of cloth or a t-shirt or scarf in public places when there is increased human contact with each other. He didn’t do it because the message changed, that we should not keep our distance, but just to give the virus even fewer opportunities to be transmitted by people who have it without knowing it or just before they show symptoms when there is high congestion (which it should not at this time) and when there is significant transmission in the community as in some areas at this time. What does this mean in practice? That I may have the virus and not know it? We’ve said it, yes this is the way we should react. Can I protect others from exposure to my own virus in this case? Again, the answer is yes. Americans say “wearing a face mask, a cloth mask so I don’t stick to them when I come in contact with a lot of people like the supermarket or the pharmacy,” say fellow American colleagues. Of course, we have said to avoid close contact with too many peaple at this time. And beware, these covers are not the surgical medical masks we want for our hospitals and our healthcare. ”

 

Laurel Wamsley Reporter

Last Updated March 31, 8:25 p.m. ET

A few months ago, it might have seemed silly to wear a face mask during a visit to the grocery store. In fact, the main message of public health in the United States from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was that most people do not need to wear masks. But as cases of pandemics have soared, there is new thought about the benefits that masks could offer in slowing the spread of the spread.

The CDC says it is now reviewing its policy and may consider a recommendation to encourage wider use. Currently, the CDC website says that the only ones who have to wear a face mask are those who are ill or care for someone who is ill and unable to wear a mask. But in an interview with NPR on Monday, CDC Director Robert Redfield said the organization was looking at data on the use of a mask by the general public. “I can tell you that his data and the question of whether he is going to contribute to prevention are being reviewed aggressively when we talk,” Redfield told NPR. And on Tuesday, President Trump pointed out that people may want to wear scarves. “I would do it,” he said, noting that masks are needed for healthcare workers. “You can use a scarf, you can use something else,” he said. On Tuesday, Dr. Deborah Birks, who acts as White House Response Coordinator, said the working group was still discussing whether to change the mask recommendation. Other leading public health experts have raised the issue in recent days. Using a mask is “an extra layer of protection for those who need to get out,” former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in an interview with NPR. It’s a step you can take – over washing your hands and avoiding concentrations.

Other leading public health experts have raised the issue in recent days. Using a mask is “an extra layer of protection for those who need to get out,” former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in an interview with NPR. It’s a step you can take – over washing your hands and avoiding concentrations. In a document describing a roadmap to reopen the country, Gottlieb argues that the public should be encouraged to wear masks during this current period of social distancing, for the common good. “Facial masks will be more effective in slowing down the spread of SARS-CoV-2 if widely used because they can help prevent people who have been infected asymptomatically from transmitting the disease unknowingly,” Gottlieb writes. Gottlieb points out South Korea and Hong Kong – two sites that have been shown to successfully manage cases and where face masks are widely used. A leading public health leader in China also supports the widespread use of masks in public. The director general of the Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the United States and Europe is making a “big mistake” with people not wearing masks during this pandemic. In particular, he said, the use of a mask helps reduce the risk of people being infected, but they do not yet show symptoms.

This means that there is no good way to know who is infected. If you’re trying to be responsible when you go out in public, you may not even know you’re sick and you may accidentally transmit the virus every time you talk to someone, such as a grocery store employee. “If these asymptomatic people could wear face masks, then community transmission could be reduced,” said Elaine Shuo Feng, a researcher in infectious disease epidemiology at the Oxford Vaccine Team at Oxford University. Given the reality of asymptomatic spread, masks can be a good socially responsible insurance policy, Gottlieb argues. “Wearing a mask protects people from getting sick from you,” he says. But there is still great concern about mask shortages in the United States. A survey released Friday by the U.S. Mayors’ Conference found that about 92% of 213 cities did not have enough face mask for first responders and medical staff.

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